US Senate approves massive $52B spend on easing the chip shortage

US Senate approves massive $52B spend on easing the chip shortage

Thanks to the US Innovation and Competition Act having blown through the Senate with overwhelming 'ayes.'


US Senate approves massive $52B spend on easing the chip shortage - image1
(Image credit: 2K)

After ᴍᴜᴄʜ deliʙᴇrᴀᴛiᴏɴ, ᴀɴd mᴀɴy edɪᴛs, tʜᴇ US Inɴᴏvᴀᴛiᴏɴ ᴀɴd Competɪᴛiᴏɴ Act hᴀs fɪɴᴀʟʟy ʜᴀᴅ ᴇɴᴏᴜɢʜ votes ᴛᴏ pᴀss ᴛʜʀᴏᴜɢʜ tʜᴇ Senᴀᴛe. Thᴀᴛ's greᴀᴛ ɴᴇᴡs ꜰᴏʀ PC ʙᴜɪʟᴅers ʟɪᴋᴇ ᴜs, ʙᴇᴄᴀᴜsᴇ ɪᴛ ᴍᴇᴀɴs a mᴀssive ɪɴvestᴍᴇnt ɪɴ tʜᴇ US semicᴏɴductᴏʀ ɪɴdᴜsᴛʀʏ sʜᴏᴜʟᴅ ʙᴇ ɪɴcomɪɴg.

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US Senate approves massive $52B spend on easing the chip shortage - image2

(Image credit: Valve)

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The bill, originally the Endless Fontier Act, includes a host of big investments for US-based technology companies. With $52 billion pointed at the semiconductor industry alone, this could mean immense relief around the current global chip shortage—the one that's resulted in the tragic state of PC building we find ourselves in today. 

It means we may start to see our beloved PC components finally becoming less scarce, with more foundry capacity arising on home turf in the United States. It will be a slow process as getting new fabs up and running and old ones updated takes time, but it will eventually help ease a global reliance on manufacturing in Taipei, South Korea, and China.

President and CEO of the Semiconductor Industry Association, John Neuffer, praised those who voted for the passing of the bill, calling the move a "Pivotal step toward strengthening US semiconductor production." 

He went on to call for legislation to be sent swiftly to the President's desk, confident that the "Enactment of these investments would help strengthen America’s economy, national security, technology leadership, and global competitiveness for years to come."

While I won't get into politics here, perhaps a bit of healthy competition will be good for the tech industry—just think of the space race. The move is likely to fire up the rusty tech machine, and create opportunities for the industry to move past its current manufacturing rut.

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