So, actual graphics card smugglers are now a thing then

So, actual graphics card smugglers are now a thing then

Somewhere there's a GPU miner missing a whole lot of graphics cards after a 2am raid by Hong Kong authorities.


So, actual graphics card smugglers are now a thing then - image2
(Image credit: TVB News)

Graphics ᴄᴀʀds ᴀʀᴇ ɴᴏw sᴏ proꜰɪᴛᴀʙʟᴇ crimɪɴal gᴀɴgs ᴀʀᴇ ᴡɪʟʟɪɴg ᴛᴏ rɪsk ʀᴜɴnɪɴg foul ᴏꜰ tʜᴇ Hᴏɴg Kᴏɴg authᴏʀɪᴛies simply ᴛᴏ smuggle unlaʙᴇlʟᴇᴅ GPUs. TVB News (via Tom's Hardwᴀʀᴇ) hᴀs repᴏʀted thᴀᴛ 300 Nvidia graphics ᴄᴀʀds, specɪꜰicᴀʟʟy ꜰᴏʀ GPU mɪɴɪɴg, ʜᴀᴠᴇ ʙᴇen seized ᴅᴜʀɪɴɢ a 2am raid ᴊᴜsᴛ ᴏᴜᴛsɪᴅᴇ ᴏꜰ Hᴏɴg Kᴏɴg Internᴀᴛiᴏɴal Airpᴏʀt.

I'll admit, the actual smuggling angle initially had me confused. However much we might rail against the use of GPUs in large-scale mining operations, it's not illegal for those outfits to buy up a block of 300 new graphics cards for the privilege. 

But it is now incredibly expensive.

The Nvidia CMP 30HX cards, which these unmarked cards seem to be, don't have a listed retail price we can find, but there are reports of these GPUs hitting the market for over $720. With a nominal Ethereum hash rate of 26 MH/s that puts these cards at the same level as a GTX 1660 Super, once a $230 graphics card, making a hell of a markup.

And another nightmarish sign of the GPU endtimes we're living through.

With a street price of around $217,000 for the 300 CMP 30HX cards you can understand why some enterprising malfeasants would happily help you cut out the middle man for a more reasonable price, and why that might be attractive to some serious cryptocurrency miners looking to quickly turn a profit.

The Hong Kong Customs and Excise Department, however, is not to be trifled with. The authorities reportedly found this fishing boat anchored just outside the airport to be mildly suspicious and subsequently discovered smugglers loading boxes of goodies into speedboats from the boat.

So, actual graphics card smugglers are now a thing then - image3
So, actual graphics card smugglers are now a thing then - image4

(Image credit: TVB News)

On being discovered the smugglers fled in their speedboats and headed back to the mainland, evading the customs boys in blue and making a clean getaway, potentially with other fun stuff in tow. They might have already unloaded a whole bunch of GeForce RTX 3080s, who knows...

The customs folk did detain the owner of the fishing boat, however, and that's when they discovered those 300 graphics card nestled in among smartphones, sea cucumbers, and shark fins. And system RAM too, because that's seemingly worth smuggling too.

(Image credit: TVB News)

What's going to happen to those poor graphics cards though? That's what we want to know, though we're not convinced an email to the Hong Kong Customs and Excise Department will yield many answers, we'll keep you posted. It's possible that, as contraband, the Turing GPUs will be destroyed [sharp intake of breath] but don't worry, they don't have outputs so you can't game on them anyways.

But spare a thought for those crypto miners not getting their illicit graphics cards, and tell me if their sadness doesn't raise a smile and warm the heart just a little.

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